Judith Steele

Féminin 1913 - 2011

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  • Naissance  5 déc 1913  Chicago Trouvez tous les individus avec un événement dans ce lieu 
    Sexe  Féminin 
    Décès  28 jan 2011  Paris 15e Trouvez tous les individus avec un événement dans ce lieu 
    ID personne  I13  MainTree
    Dernière modif.  12 déc 2011 

    Père  George Francis Steele,   n. 1867 
    Mère  Alice Frederick,   n. 12 juil 1883, Shelbina, Missouri Trouvez tous les individus avec un événement dans ce lieu,   d. 1951, Montreal, Canada Trouvez tous les individus avec un événement dans ce lieu 
    Mariage  1910 
    ID Famille  F48  Feuille familiale

    Famille  Jules Charles Henri Gentil,   n. 10 fév 1898, Annecy Trouvez tous les individus avec un événement dans ce lieu,   d. mai 1985 
    Mariage  17 août 1933  Annecy Trouvez tous les individus avec un événement dans ce lieu 
    • Mariage civil le 17 aout 1933 à la maire d'Annecy, religieux le 19 août 1933 à Menton-Saint-Bernard
    Enfants 
     1. M. Gentil
    >2. A.A.V. Gentil
     3. D. Gentil
    Dernière modif.  28 août 2005 
    ID Famille  F4  Feuille familiale

  • Photos
    Judith
    Judith
    Au moins un individu vivant est lié à cette photo - Détails cachés.
    Il y a bien longtemps...
    Il y a bien longtemps...
    Au moins un individu vivant est lié à cette photo - Détails cachés.
    Au moins un individu vivant est lié à cette photo - Détails cachés.
    Au moins un individu vivant est lié à cette photo - Détails cachés.
    Au moins un individu vivant est lié à cette photo - Détails cachés.
    Alfred Cortot, Judith Steele, ???, Jules Charles Henri Gentil et Madame Cortot
    Alfred Cortot, Judith Steele, ???, Jules Charles Henri Gentil et Madame Cortot
    Au moins un individu vivant est lié à cette photo - Détails cachés.
    Au moins un individu vivant est lié à cette photo - Détails cachés.

  • Notes 
    • In "Un-loving" Memory of Purple-haired Miss Schneider
      At the January 10 seniors' meeting, the AAWE seniors were fortunate to meet special guest Madame Judith Gentil and hear of her life as an American living in France during the darker days of WWII German occupation. Phyllis Michaux introduced this charming 91 year-old woman, who had been a young mother in Paris in the 1940's, and whose French husband worried that she would be denounced to German authorities (by another French citizen, in exchange for money), and sent to an internment camp (in Compiegne or elsewhere) along with many other Enlgish speaking persons in Paris at that time. So she obtained false French papers for her and moved her and their three children out of Paris and to the safety of Rambouillet.

      Judy was able to live a quiet country life there, including "tending true red, ripe tomatoes." In August 1945, German tanks were seen suddenly rolling through town and away from Paris; on August 17, American military troops arrived, and began preparing for imminent entrance into Paris. Judy quickly served as a translator, and when she introduced herself "to an American man who was drinking a tall whiskey in the local bar", he introduced himself to her as... Ernest Hemignway. Indeed the great writer was en route with driver alongside U.S. troops. They stayed "four remarkable days" as her guests in her attic quarters in Rambouillet.

      After the war ended, Judith and her children returned to Paris, where she soon went to the American Embassy's Passport department to obtain a reissued passport (hers had been damaged during the war.) Thus the famous encouter with purple-haired Miss Schneider, head of the department. Judith handed her damaged American passport, and Miss Schneider refused to return it to her and/or issue her a new one.

      Schneider's reasoning was that Judith had been using false French papers, which she interpreted as meaning Judy's taking French citizenship and therefore disqualification for continued American citizenship. Miss Schneider was maintaining an interpretation of American law that, while accurate at the time, was insensitive to the extraordinary difficulites of war-time France and an American mother's attempt to protect heself and her children without thought of jeopardizing American citizenship.

      AAWE's founder, Phyllis Micaux was also in France during the 1940's and later learned of Judith's story. Phyllis made it a point that it not be forgotten, and she describes it in detail on page 9 of her book Unknown Ambassadors (highly suggested reading for all AAWE members!)

      It was with great pleasure that those present on heard, first hand, memories of this remarkable bit of WWII history in France. It was a truly special exchange - between Judith, Phyllis and AAWE members of today - after so many years gone by.

      Caroline Zach-Guillou
    • Habitait 1155 Park avenue, New York pendant son enfance.